Pareidolia

Posted By on October 29, 2016

3488396_d011_1024x2000

Image courtesy bookofresearch.wordpress.com

This is a the first in a three-part series of poems written under the general title of “Witness.”

Each poem corresponds to a description of a state of being a witness. The first one is “Pareidolia.”  I wrote this one thinking about  the Oxfrauds and their ridiculous campaign to bring the culture down to their level of intellectual acuity a la the Stratfordian cult.

The First: Pareidolia

I saw the Paul McCartney geoscape
On earth. Watching from the moon
I looked back over my shoulder in the
Rear view mirror where I descried
His pucker on Lonely Hearts Club Band,
In bold relief, some clouds whisping in and out of
A luxury of whiskers, all transposed into blue-green longitudes
and  latitudes with attitudes. It was definitely him.

 

About the author

Roger Stritmatter is a native liberal humorist who lives in Baltimore, Maryland. Contrary to rumor, he does not live on North Avenue. He does, however, work on North Avenue. A pacifist by inclination, one of his heroes is John Brown. But he thinks that Fredrick Douglass, another of his heroes, made the right decision. Stritmatter's primary areas of interest include the nature of paradigm shifts, the history of ideas, forensic literary studies, MS studies, renaissance literature, and the history of the Shakespearean question, the latter a field in which he has published extensively.

Comments

2 Responses to “Pareidolia”

  1. shelphi says:

    Very lyrical!
    Paul lives on.
    -ellehcim

    That’s not Arabic.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

  • Categories

  • Archives

In "From Crackpot to Mainstream"Keir Cutler, PhD, takes down the recent Shakespeare Beyond Doubt (OUP, 2013)

Criticism of Cutler's "Is Shakespeare Dead?": "A magnificently witty performance!" (Winnipeg Sun). "Highly entertaining and engrossing!" (EYE Weekly). "Is Shakespeare Dead? marshals startling facts into an elegant and often tenacious argument that floats on a current of delicious irony" (Montreal Gazette).