Freedom of Inquiry Alive and Well at WSU

Posted By on November 18, 2011

 Dr. Michael Delahoyde and his student Leda Zakarias at Washington State University in Pullman, WN, speak out on the authorship question on local news.

About the author

Roger Stritmatter is a native liberal humorist who lives in Baltimore, Maryland. Contrary to rumor, he does not live on North Avenue. He does, however, work on North Avenue. A pacifist by inclination, one of his heroes is John Brown. But he thinks that Fredrick Douglass, another of his heroes, made the right decision. Stritmatter's primary areas of interest include the nature of paradigm shifts, the history of ideas, and renaissance literature, the latter a field in which he has published extensively

Comments

3 Responses to “Freedom of Inquiry Alive and Well at WSU”

  1. Lurking Ox says:

    Wow, that’s pretty good! Hope that WSU prof has tenure, or emeritus status, or something….

  2. richard waugaman says:

    Leda’s enthusiasm for the works of Shakespeare and for the authorship question are both inspiring to see. I’ve heard this is precisely how students react when courageous English teachers such as Delahoyde are willing to let their students know it’s an important and unresolved question. Let’s hope some students will be inspired to help answer it!

  3. Roger Stritmatter says:

    Indeed, without taking away from Leda’s originality and uniqueness, I would have to agree that this is a fairly typical example of the “Eureka!” enthusiasm with which students react to the Oxford case. That is, of course, why the Stratfordian strategy requires a continued stranglehold on free thinking in classroom. Free-thinking dissent must be stamped out, or all is lost….

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